The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

Watchable Wednesdays

True to its name, every Wednesday I hope to share with you videos which I have enjoyed and think you might, too.  We all need a bit of cheering up to last until the end of the week, don’t we?

This is such a sweet animation, it will surely brighten up your day.

Found via The Happiest Cow! That blog is great.

STL.

The History of the English Language in 10 Minutes

Welcome to Somersaulting Through Life’s new weekly feature:

Watchable Wednesdays

True to its name, every Wednesday I hope to share with you videos which I have enjoyed and think you might, too.  We all need a bit of cheering up to last until the end of the week, don’t we?

To kick off, here is a thoroughly informative and entertaining cartoon documentary of the birth of the English language.  It is the first of a 10-part series by the Open University, which I highly recommend for all avid readers or any who are interested in the words we use on a daily basis.

The full length version (PG) only takes up 10 minutes of your time and is sure to make you chuckle.  The cartoons are rather “Horrible Histories”-esque and that is why I like them.  My personal favourite is Chapter III: Shakespeare – a perfect example of an educational diversion from the stress of weekdays.

I hope you enjoy.
STL.

My 91 Year-old Book

I am currently reading a book of Wordsworth’s poetry which was published 91 years ago, in 1921.  The wonderful thing about reading old, vintage books is knowing that other people have read them before.  It might be nice to buy new books from commercial stores, to smell the crisp pages of fresh ink, but what’s the point?  It’s not helping anyone, especially not the trees.  I found this one in a local Red Cross charity shop and bought it for £1.  You can find the same books in charity shops for a tenth of the price than in a normal bookshop and they look way better on your bookshelf at home.  Although it may be a bit worn around the edges (this one has been battered quite a bit), you know that your book has been loved.

It’s not just the words of ink inside which tell stories, it’s the cover, too.  Books sit on shelves for hundreds of years in the same room, in the same library.  They watch children turn into adults and generations pass by; they travel around the world in bags, backpacks and suitcases and they are read again and again by all sorts of people, at all sorts of times.  Some are the sources of  happiness, sadness or even self-realisation.

My 91 year-old book has sat on a shelf through WWII, the entirety of the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the elections of 22 British Prime Ministers, the opening of the second millennium, the landing of the first man on the Moon, the invention of Penicillin and more…

Go on, go to your local charity bookstore and search for a gem like this one.  You’ll feel sanguine.

STL.